Archive for the ‘Patient Fitness’ Category

Considering a Fitness Franchise as a Wellness Program to Your Practice? Think Again…

Most healthcare professionals that I talk to love the idea of incorporating a medical fitness and wellness program into their practice, because of the obvious benefits of being able to really help their patients be more healthy and adding an all-cash revenue stream to their income.

This much is pretty consistent within the healthcare industry.

However, there are differing views on the best way to make this happen, and I must say — one of the ways really is WAY better than the other.

Basically, there are two options: 1) start your own program from the ground up using a proven “template” or 2) buy some sort of developed fitness franchise and adhere to their exact rules and regulations.

The second option might sounds nice, right? At least, it sounds like less work. But the truth is there are some major downsides to buying a franchise.

Crucial Medical Fitness Component #2: A Structured, Supervised Program

fitness programA typical health club or gym offers a membership approach to fitness. You get to “pay to play” on their toys or in their classes whenever they’re open.  On the other hand, a well-run medical fitness center offers a program approach to fitness. This means your patients receive structured, supervised programs and services that address their individual needs on an ongoing basis.

Here are the four fundamental ingredients to include in your patient’s program:

1.   Exercise Readiness Screening - You need a systematic process that screens for chronic conditions and the potential for exercise-related injuries. This makes it easier to decide how to adjust your program to meet their needs.

Crucial Medical Fitness Component #1: A Defined Market

I’m sure you’ve heard the old saying, “Become a master of one, not a jack of all trades.”  If you haven’t, the idea is that you will be more productive and useful if you have laser-like focus on one thing, than if you dabble in many different areas.

Health clubs practice the “jack of all trades” approach to fitness and try to have something there for everyone.  As a health professional with an individual practice, you’re not going to be able to compete with health clubs, gyms and hospital-based wellness centers on that front.

So, one of the biggest mistakes you can make is biting off more than you can chew by trying to offer programs and services to meet the needs of every age group and fitness level in your practice.  You need to specialize.  Clearly define your niche markets — no more than one or two — and offer those niches a specialized solution for their needs.  Don’t try to target all your patients, or you’ll end up with no patients in your programs.

Powered by WordPress